Difference between revisions of "Fedora 16 Installation Guide"

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(Official AMD Driver Package from Amd.com)
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= Installing the Official AMD driver =
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I have to agree that the Gnome project bgeard ahead torpedos be damned with radical changes to the hardware requirements (and this was probably the deal-breaker for Ubuntu), as well as usability. Fair enough: it's their project, and they provide it to the community free of charge on a take-it-or-leave-it basis.KDE 4x was certainly not without it's teething pains in hardware compatibility, stability and usability. It has since matured into a plausible contender, and Gnome has some catching up to do.Surely what isn't fair is expecting a hardware vendor (like AMD) to anticipate these wild vicissitudes and be all over that with unlimited technical support. There are free radeon drivers available and yes, performance-wise they absolutely suck. I suppose that is AMD's fault too? One can also choose not to use Gnome 3 until it gets its act together, and for some that is surely more feasible than going out and splurging on a new platform. There's a reason why some gravitate towards free software: It's free. It doesn't cost anything. Um yeah I think that about sums it up. Your proposed solution  turns out to be rather expensive, compared to the alternatives. Thus defeating the point of this exercise? Think about it.
 
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== Introduction ==
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There are two methods to get the Official AMD driver installed on Fedora.  The first is by running the amd-driver-installer package supplied by amd.com.  This method is covered in the section "'''Official AMD Driver Package from Amd.com'''".  The second is to use the rpm packages supplied by the rpm fusion repos.  This method is covered in the section "'''Pre-built packages from RPMFusion'''".
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The sections titled '''Amd-driver-installer Compilation Problems on x86_64 Fedora 16''' and '''Amd-driver-installer Compilation Problems on i686 Fedora 16''' are subject to being resolved by Catalyst updates and therefore may not be relevant to installations after Catalyst version 12.4.
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== Requirements ==
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The Amd-driver-installer from Amd.com will work best in most cases if there is no xorg.conf file present before you begin the installation process. Move any existing xorg.conf files out of the /etc/X11 directory before installation.
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You will need at least version 11.11 (or greater) of the ATI driver for Fedora 16, earlier versions will not work with the version of Xorg that F16 ships with.
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For Catalyst 12.5 or above, a Radeon HD5000 series (or greater) is required.  Radeon HD 2000/3000/4000 series GPU's will not be recognized by 12.5 Catalyst and above.
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=== Multiple Monitor Setups ===
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If you have an existing multiple monitor setup, move your existing xorg.conf to a safe place.  Let amd-driver-installer  generate a fresh working xorg.conf file for you based on what it probes from EDID monitor info. If you are having difficulties after generating a new xorg.conf, use your old xorg.conf as a reference and transfer sections of that file as needed to the new one.
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Here are some resources for those having difficulty getting their multiple monitors running:
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* http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Xorg_RandR_1.2
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* http://wiki.debian.org/XStrikeForce/HowToRandR12
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* aticonfig --help
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* One of the [[Ubuntu]] guides on this Wiki.
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* AMD's own Catalyst documentation
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If you need to start with a clean slate and all your monitors are connected, you can force a fresh xorg.conf to be generated taking into account the monitors present:
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<pre>
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su -
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aticonfig --initial -f
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</pre>
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== Pre-built packages from RPMFusion ==
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''Note: This section '''does not''' apply to users using the Official amd-driver-installer package downloaded from amd.com''
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'''RECOMMENDED METHOD'''
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This is easier than manually building the driver from AMD as you don't need to worry about passing kernel options via GRUB2, configuring DKMS, rebuilding the kernel module every time you do a kernel upgrade, or cleaning up any mess if you want to remove the driver.
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=== Clean up previous Offical AMD driver installation ===
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If you're coming from the Official AMD driver to RPMFusion's AMD driver, you'll need to reinstall the ''mesa-libGL'' package as the Official AMD driver installation changes files it contains.
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<pre>
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su -
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yum reinstall mesa-libGL
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</pre>
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=== Other issues before install driver ===
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On Acer Aspire 722 (A0722) with Radeon HD 6290 (and i suppose on other machines with the same card) you must disable SELinux or the follow error will occured :
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<pre>
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SELinux is preventing gnome-session-c from execmod access on the file /usr/lib/dri/fglrx_dri.so. For complete SELinux messages run sealert -l <SELinux alert id>
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</pre>
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To disable SELinux open /etc/selinux/config file as root and set SELINUX to disabled (SELINUX=disabled).
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After that driver will work as expected.<br>
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<b>Note:</b> Disabling SELinux is not a very good idea. It's better to just modify the policy, by running these two commands (as root):
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<pre>semanage fcontext -a -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/dri/fglrx_dri.so'
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restorecon -v '/usr/lib/dri/fglrx_dri.so'</pre>
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'''glxinfo'''
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<pre>
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direct rendering : Yes
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...
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OpenGL vendor string : Advanced Microd Devices Inc.
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OpenGL render string : AMD Radeon HD 6290 Graphics
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...
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</pre>
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anderson laud - Yes it can. This post was originally wreittn after release of Fedora Core 10. I used this install "mplayer" procedure for every Fedora release up to Fedora Core 14. In a few weeks, FC15 will be available so keep on eye this "mplayer" cookbook - it will surely be useful ... Cheers!
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=== Install Catalyst driver packages ===
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This procedure is the same for 32-bit and 64-bit, yum will automatically install the correct driver and libs for your architecture.
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<pre>
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su -
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yum install akmod-catalyst xorg-x11-drv-catalyst xorg-x11-drv-catalyst-libs
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</pre>
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''' 32-bit Libraries on 64-bit OS'''
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If you want to play 32-bit games on a 64-bit Fedora installation, you will need to install the 32-bit libraries in addition to the above step.
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<pre>
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su -
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yum install xorg-x11-drv-catalyst-libs.i686
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</pre>
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''' Kernel module packages '''
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Note that there are individual ''kmod-catalyst-'' packages in RPMFusion which supply kernel modules for specific Fedora kernel versions. If you use these and you upgrade the kernel without upgrading the ''kmod-catalyst-'' package, loading the proprietary driver will fail and you'll revert back to the Free ''radeon'' graphics driver. Sometimes there is a day or so between Fedora upgrading their kernel and RPMFusion building a new ''kmod-catalyst-'' package.
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The ''akmod-catalyst'' package we installed above automatically builds a new kernel module at boot-time when the kernel is upgraded, so you'll never have to worry about this.
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Гонялись (и гоняются) коды вида Numeric Weather Simulation. На x86_64 это Infiniband кластер, а на IA64 это SGI Altix 4700. Дровишки --- из конторы которая поменяла dropped "e" в своем логотипе.
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= Troubleshooting =
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In the event you install the driver and are greeted with a blank screen or corrupted video signal when starting X, you are able to manually disable the Free Software ''radeon'' driver to troubleshoot.
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There are two methods to disable radeon module.  The first is a two-step process and the other approach is listed below.
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''Approach #1:''
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1) Edit the /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf and add radeon to the list.
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2) Run the following:
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<pre>
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su -
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/sbin/new-kernel-pkg --package kernel --mkinitrd --dracut --depmod --install $(uname -r)
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</pre>
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That's itThis will generate a new initramfs that does not have radeon built in. This method has the advantage of not affecting kernel mode setting as well as not needing any grub editsOn the next boot, the radeon module should be gone. You can now reboot to console and execute steps in section above titled "''Official AMD Driver Package from Amd.com''"
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''Approach #2:''
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Turn your system off and on again. On the GRUB boot screen, press '''e''' to edit the default boot entry, scroll down to the kernel line (which begins ''linux''), then press '''e''' again to edit the line.
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Add the entries '''radeon.modeset=0 blacklist=radeon''' to the end. For example, if your kernel line is
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<pre>linux /vmlinuz-3.2.9-1.fc16.x86_64 LANG=en_US.UTF-8</pre>
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we'll want to edit it so it is
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<pre>linux /vmlinuz-3.2.9-1.fc16.x86_64 LANG=en_US.UTF-8 radeon.modeset=0 rdblacklist=radeon blacklist=radeon</pre>
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These entries do the following:
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* '''radeon.modeset=0''' disables "Kernel Mode Settting" for the Free Software driver (ie: the driver telling the kernel to setup the screen resolution, instead of XOrg doing it)
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* '''rdblacklist=radeon blacklist=radeon''' stops the kernel from loading the Free Software ''radeon'' driver altogether
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From here you can manually remove and reinstall the proprietary drivers, either with yum or with PackageKit's ''Add/Remove Software'' application, as desired.
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Revision as of 01:59, 22 June 2012

I have to agree that the Gnome project bgeard ahead torpedos be damned with radical changes to the hardware requirements (and this was probably the deal-breaker for Ubuntu), as well as usability. Fair enough: it's their project, and they provide it to the community free of charge on a take-it-or-leave-it basis.KDE 4x was certainly not without it's teething pains in hardware compatibility, stability and usability. It has since matured into a plausible contender, and Gnome has some catching up to do.Surely what isn't fair is expecting a hardware vendor (like AMD) to anticipate these wild vicissitudes and be all over that with unlimited technical support. There are free radeon drivers available and yes, performance-wise they absolutely suck. I suppose that is AMD's fault too? One can also choose not to use Gnome 3 until it gets its act together, and for some that is surely more feasible than going out and splurging on a new platform. There's a reason why some gravitate towards free software: It's free. It doesn't cost anything. Um yeah I think that about sums it up. Your proposed solution turns out to be rather expensive, compared to the alternatives. Thus defeating the point of this exercise? Think about it.