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[[Category:Installation Documentation]]
 
[[Category:Installation Documentation]]
  
Oliver, let me be a bit more specific then. AMD dveleopers have stated that they treat xorg.conf as  the configuration of the X server and /etc/ati/ as the configuration for their driver. All of xorg.conf gets treated as a  hint . While it appears that aticonf creates an xorg.conf file, in fact what it creates is a virtual xorg.conf file, but the real, effective configuration is in /etc/ati and that is the configuration that matters.As for documentation: compare the output of aticonfig  help  to  , especially section 3 and appendixes from D onwards. As an example: it is possible to set a default overscan value with aticonfing. Can you find that in aticonfig  help ? No, because you need to use the   set-pcs-str  option with the correct (undocumented) parameters to do that, oh and you can not find them in that file too, because it does not appear in the file before it is set. Also, apparently you can set display size with aticonfig, but not refresh rate. Sure, you can set it with xrandr, but then it is not saved in /etc/ati/ and thus switches back when you restart X. Oh and don't try doing any changes to /etc/ati while the X server is running  fglrx will happily overwrite any of your changes on exit.It is madness!Oh and I was trying to get fglrx to work, because I bought a $200 video card with the explicit purpose of playing some semi-modern video games. The free driver is fantastic in 2D and in running Unity, but for real games, it is, unfortunately, way too slow and lacks most OpenGL features.
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== Aticonfig not found after installation & "module does not exist" after boot ==
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This scenario is possible when the driver installation has seemingly succeeded and is possibly related to previous fglrx installs, including those through Jockey (i.e. you first used drivers provided by Ubuntu but then upgraded to ones available from AMD's website). When doing aticonfig --initial after driver installation, you might end up not having the aticonfig available at all:
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<pre>aticonfig: command not found</pre>
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After booting you might receive X error '(EE) Failed to load module "fglrx" (module does not exist, 0)'. These do not necessarily indicate that the installation has failed completely. On command line, do
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  ls /usr/lib/fglrx/bin
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and see if the command lists some Ati related programs. If they are listed but not found from /usr/bin, it is possible that the "update-alternatives" fglrx .deb installation does has been ignored. See man update-alternatives for more information about the concept and workings of alternatives. In practice, update-alternatives is supposed to create several symbolic links to the files in the fglrx directory, but it will be ignored if the alternatives for the very related gl_conf entry has been set to manual. Do
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update-alternatives --get-selections | grep gl_conf
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and see if the mode is manual instead of auto and if mesa is mentioned instead of fglrx in the path that is printed. In this case you need to
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sudo update-alternatives --set gl_conf /usr/lib/fglrx/ld.so.conf
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to set fglrx as the active alternative. You can alternatively (no pun intended) and additionally change the gl_conf into automatic mode before the installation this way:
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sudo update-alternatives --auto gl_conf
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After that, the alternatives should automatically be configured correctly when the graphics driver .debs are installed.
  
 
== "update-alternatives: error" during install ==
 
== "update-alternatives: error" during install ==

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